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Imagine if the only way you were allowed to live is if you agreed to be a weapon in an escalating war. That's exactly what happens to 17-year-old Nym, a storm-summoner and the protagonist of Mary Weber's Storm Siren trilogy. Since the second book the series --- SIREN'S FURY --- was just published in June, we decided to celebrate by asking Mary some questions about her writing process, her own taste in YA and her advice to future writers. 
At Teenreads, we love to review the latest and greatest YA books to hit the shelves. However, we recognize that older books --- sometimes much older books --- have plenty of value, too. In this blog series, Teen Board member Alison S. is writing about some of her favorites and how they remain relevant today. Read below for her fifth post on THE CALL OF THE WILD.  You can also read her earlier posts on FRANKENSTEIN, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, THE HITCHKIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES.
Melissa de la Cruz, author of the acclaimed Blue Bloods series, returns to her past home in this blog post --- New York, New York. The city may have changed between the publication of her books, but Melissa's love of New York remained unscathed. Here, she writes how her beloved city influenced her writing, both the original Blue Bloods and its new spinoff, VAMPIRES OF MANHATTAN
Author Kris Dinnison certainly didn't have the easiest time when she was 14 and she and her best friends got into a large fight. Though the incident is now well in the past, its influence has stayed with her to this day. In part, these feelings of confusion, hurt and betrayal helped inspire her new novel, YOU AND ME AND HIM. In this blog post, she discusses how her past experience affected the story and how her characters grapple with very real-life issues.
Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY.   In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." She's already analyzed THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES --- the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- and BASKERVILLE, a novel in which author John O'Connell delves into Doyle's possible motivation. In her final blog post in the series, below, she takes on Graham Moore's THE SHERLOCKIAN and wraps up her take on the mystery. Read it, now!  
When author Shari Becker was forced to take detours on a road trip because of Hurricane Sandy, the idea for her new novel THE STELLOW PROJECT was born. In this blog post, Shari details how her lifelong anxiety affected her and how she perceived the news. Being directly affected by a hurricane made her reflect on the rapidly changing climate, which in turn became a theme in THE STELLOW PROJECT. In this blog post, she writes about how modern-day issues inspired her fictitious world.
Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PORTRAIT OF DORIAN GRAY. In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." In her first post, she looked at the the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES . This post tackles BASKERVILLE, a novel in which author John O'Connell delves into Doyle's possible motivation.
There's a lot more that goes into a book than what we see on a store shelf! Teenreads intern Hannah Kaufman writes about various internships that have taught her about the literary world, which is ultimately a sprawling and dynamic network. In this blog post, she talks about insights gleaned from working both at Teenreads and a literary agency, and what those jobs have taught her about the literary community and herself.
Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PORTRAIT OF DORIAN GRAY. In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." In this post, she looks at the the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES --- and in future posts, will talk about the different theories behind Doyle's mysterious choice. 
Mark Haddon's novel THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME has been adapted for the big stage. The Broadway production is now playing and has won five Tony Awards, including the award for Best Play. Teenreads.com intern Sydney had the chance to see this show in New York and shares her opinion below.