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Today is National Librarian Day! To celebrate this important day, five of our reviewers share their favorite librarian and library memories, below. Look out for a follow-up post from our Teen Board!
A few weeks ago I was on a panel about Grief in YA Fiction at the NYC Teen Author Festival (Shara did a great recap of the whole symposium here). The moderator, author Jon Skovron, pointed out that in my new YA contemporary novel, THIS SIDE OF SALVATION, “the parents really fail their children.”
                Teenreads is so excited to be part of the blog tour for ALWAYS EMILY by Michaela MacColl! You may remember Michaela from our recent Side by Side feature on Emily Dickinson, where we featured her book NOBODY'S SECRET.  Here, she enlightens Teenreads on the important role that pets have played in her books --- and in her leading ladies' real lives.
GOING OVER takes place in 1983 Germany, where Ada and Stefan are in love --- but Ada lives in West Berlin, and Stefan lives in East Berlin. Bound by love and separated by circumstance, their only chance for a life together lies in a high-risk escape. In this blog post, part of the GOING OVER blog tour, author Beth Kephart shares photos from a 2011 trip to the city. Read on to see her photos, and to learn about the other stops on the tour!
Ava, the 16-year-old protagonist of SALVAGE, has some tough times ahead --- after the spaceship she grew up on evicts her, she has to escape to earth and learn to survive on a difficult, foreign planet. And she must struggle with something else, too --- learning to read and write. In this guest post, author Alexandra Duncan discusses why she wrote about an illiterate character, delving into her time as a reading tutor in college and her own difficulties with math and science homework.    
March is National Women's History Month, and the Teen Board is celebrating through a series of blog posts! Every Thursday this month, a different Teen Board member is writing a post that somehow relates to women and literature, so make sure you keep an eye out each week! This final post is by Kate F., where she interviewed four amazing YA authors --- Rosamund Hodge (CRUEL BEAUTY), Susan Dennard (SOMETHING STRANGE AND DEADLY), Sara B. Larson (DEFY) and Erin Bowman (TAKEN) --- about their views on reading and writing strong female heroines!  
Last week was an amazing time for YA fans in New York City --- it was the NYC Teen Author Festival! This is exactly what it sounds like --- an entire week packed with top YA authors reading from their books, discussing important topics about the genre, and performing from each other's works in a staple in co-founder David Levithan's repertoire: Reader's Theater. I was only able to make the festival on Friday, but luckily that day was jam-packed with excellent programming. Here is a list of the panels I attended, and the highlights from each:
Veronica Roth's bestselling YA Divergent series made its long-awaited theatrical debut last Friday. I was lucky enough (thanks to HarperCollins!) to catch an advanced screening on Thursday afternoon at one of the best theaters (and a personal fave!) in town. Just like any other Superfan (or diehard movie enthusiast), I would have willingly waited in line for a good seat at midnight as the flick delivered a star-studded cast, great music and the best part of all, a compelling story. But it was all made so much more enjoyable with a courtesy small popcorn and soda in hand. And I can't forget to mention the brief, but very heartfelt speech Roth gave as an introduction to the movie (yes, she was present in flesh and blood) --- she has a way of making each and every one of her readers feel like a special part of her book's growing success. I'll give you some highlights of the movie that are sure to make you more pumped about your planned viewing for this upcoming weekend...in case you haven't seen it yet. (But, seriously...have you been living under a rock?!)
March is National Women's History Month, and the Teen Board is celebrating through a series of blog posts! Every Thursday this month, a different Teen Board member is writing a post that somehow relates to women and literature, so make sure you keep an eye out each week! The third one is by Ashley L., where she talks about the rise of the female heroine in YA books (and the movies they inspire).  
There are some parts of being a writer that are relatively solitary --- you can hole up in your room with your computer or draft a story in a notebook on a park bench without speaking to a single soul. But as Teenreads intern, MFA student and public speaking-hater Rebecca Czochor knows, some parts are much more public, like particpating in an author reading. If you also dread reading your stories out loud, have no fear --- Rebecca gives some fool-proof tips on going from panicky to pro!