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Archives - August 2013

The problem with dorm rooms is space. While packing for my first year at Ohio State, I came across the dilemma that I could not possibly bring all my books with me. I would just have to choose. Should I bring the books I love best or those that are most meaningful to me? Or should I bring those that actually might be useful in school?
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
When you’re a big fan of a book, it can be hard to see the book be made into the movie. Sure it’s fun and exciting, but no matter how great the movie looks, there’s still a small part of you that’s nervous to go see the movie. This is what I was feeling when I went to go see City of Bones on Wednesday. 
Sand, beach towels and books; that is what my family vacations usually consist of. I come from a long line of readers and book swapping while on vacation has become something of a tradition. We each have our own, distinct style; my grandfather loves crime novels while my cousin Kelly is all about connecting with characters. Me? I’ll read just about anything. Not only is my family extremely bookish, but while on vacation, we’re also extremely lazy. We’re talking sit on the beach from 10 am to 5 pm lazy. Luckily, lazy beach days make for a lot of reading time.
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
When was the last time you saw your fellow classmates nose-to-pages riveted to the thick works of Dickens? Or sighing, melancholy, over Shakespeare at the beach? Um. Never.
My mother has always been avid about reading, sometimes more so than myself. During my youngest days, she would read me to bed each night, and as I grew older, I was reading to her. When I discovered the Goosebumps series in the second grade, I would relay the latest twists and turns of each chapter to her with childish fervor. As far as I was aware, she paid close attention to my ramblings. By the time I was in the fifth grade, I had gravitated toward the lumbering shelf of books that was in our living room. It was comprised mostly of Mary Higgins Clark, a mystery and suspense writer. Intrigued, I went to my mother and asked her about them. She went on to tell me about her lifelong love of Mary Higgins Clark, and how Clark had been responsible for her interest in reading.
If you can’t figure out what to do while waiting for that sequel you’re dying for, then here are some ideas!