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Archives - September 2013

Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
This week (September 22-28th) is Banned Books Week in the US! For those of you wondering what Banned Books Week is, it’s a week to celebrate the freedom to read. This week was created because of the multitude of book banning in children’s, young adult, and adult novels. Yes, this week was launched in the 1980s, but don’t let the date fool you. Books are still being banned today. Most recently, ELEANOR AND PARK by Rainbow Rowell was banned just last week, when school librarians put this novel on a reading list. The parents at this school were outraged, calling ELEANOR AND PARK “dangerously obscene.” While it is true ELEANOR AND PARK has foul language, as a high school student, you will hear at least some foul language every day! As a teenager who has read and loved this novel, I believe this is wrong, and I am not alone. If you are a parent and don’t want your child reading books that have foul language, alcohol use, etc. then talk to them about it instead of banning this novel for other readers who may enjoy and learn from the novel.
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
Elizabeth Miles' conclusion to the Fury series is ETERNITY, in which Em is driven slowly crazy by a reoccurring dream and the Furies staying close at bay. And she feels...different: She’s angry, and never cold, and too strong. Without Drea’s help, or anyone to turn to, Em is quickly running out of options. In this blog post, Elizabeth Miles describes a situation she experienced in high school, where should would have loved to have summoned the Furies. And don't forget to scroll down to watch the trailer for ETERNITY!
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
Every year, it seems that a new series takes teenagers by storm. Everyone’s reading it, everyone’s talking about it, and --- surprise! --- they’re making a movie out of it. The series paraphernalia is strung up all over the mall, and it seems you can’t escape the endless cycle of movie trailers on TV.
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.
Are you in the New York City area and are free to attend a YA lit event on Thursday? Then you're in luck! The 92nd St Y is launching their new YA lit series this Thursday, September 12th at 7:30pm with special guest Samantha Shannon, author of THE BONE SEASON --- and this will be her ONLY New York appearence! Want to go? Email me (liz@bookreporter.com) for a chance to win a free ticket! I have two tickets to give away and will decide the winners by Wednesday, September 11th at noon ET. But if you're like me and DESPERATELY WANT TO GO BUT CAN'T (Gahhhh!) then check out the future lit events put on by 92Y. Future guests include Veronica Roth (Divergent series), Christopher Paolini (Inheritance Cycle series), Lois Duncan and more. Click here for more details!
Author Francesca Lia Block has been quite busy lately, with her latest YA book, LOVE IN THE TIME OF GLOBAL WARMING, pubished in August and the paperback edition of THE ELEMENTALS to come out later this month. As an author who writes for both adults and young adults, the line between adult and YA literature can easily become blurred, especially if the protagonist is in her teens. In this blog post, Block explains how one story can appeal to both adults, new adults and teens.
Realistic fiction is a unique genre in YA because it illustrates challenging situations you may not have personally experienced but connects you to emotions you have. Whether it's uncovering life-altering secrets, making a tough choice, coming to terms with your sexuality or finding your voice, realistic fiction addresses themes relevant to real life. To highlight some of their fantastic realistic fiction, Macmillan established their ReaLITy program. Our Teen Board decided to check out these reads and respond to them in this blog series.