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Real Talk Publishing: The People Behind the Books

We know you love to read, but have you ever considered working with books as a career? If so, there are tons of options to explore. With this feature, we'll introduce you to book editors, librarians, booksellers, children's literature professors, book cover designers, publicists, professional reviewers and more. Through interviews, guest posts and sometimes sneak peeks inside their offices, we'll take you into their worlds so you can learn about the book industry.

Real Talk Publishing: Charisse Meloto and Sheila Marie Everett

Charisse Meloto (far right) --- Executive Director of Publicity for Print and Digital  Publishing at Scholastic --- has a desk that looks like a bright, tchotchke-filled mix of a kindergarten classroom and a museum. You can play with kinetic sand,which Charisse claims is really fun for people who come in for meetings (she’s right --- I was not immune to its charms), but simultaneously admire original artwork from Jon J 

Real Talk Publishing: Rachel Fershleiser, Part 3

A lot of you are probably familiar with Tumblr --- that social media website where you can engage in your favorite fandoms, share images, stories, memes and quotes and connect with people from across the globe.

One of the cool things about Tumblr is that it has a HUGE book presence, including authors, readers, publishers, bookstores and everything in between. You can connect in Tumblr’s book club, share photos of your favorite-book-inspired manicure or participate in genuine discussions with authors about your favorite (or least favorite) character.

And even cooler still, it’s someone’s JOB to make sure that all of this “book content” runs smoothly. We talked to that person --- officially called the Head of Publisher Outreach --- for our latest Real Talk Publishing interview, and we couldn’t be more excited to share this super modern, ever-changing and fun part of the business.

Read the third part of our interview with Rachel Fershleiser, below, to learn why she is such a huge proponent of the "Bookternet," her favorite books growing up and her predictions for the future of publishing. And if you missed them, click here to read Part 1 of the interview, and here to read Part 2!


Real Talk Publishing: Rachel Fershleiser, Part 2

A lot of you are probably familiar with Tumblr --- that social media website where you can engage in your favorite fandoms, share images, stories, memes and quotes and connect with people from across the globe.

One of the cool things about Tumblr is that it has a HUGE book presence, including authors, readers, publishers, bookstores and everything in between. You can connect in Tumblr’s book club, share photos of your favorite-book-inspired manicure or participate in genuine discussions with authors about your favorite (or least favorite) character.

And even cooler still, it’s someone’s JOB to make sure that all of this “book content” runs smoothly. We talked to that person --- officially called the Head of Publisher Outreach --- for our latest Real Talk Publishing interview, and we couldn’t be more excited to share this super modern, ever-changing and fun part of the business.

Read below to learn about the Reblog Book Club, the most frustrating part of Rachel's job and the Great Tumblr Book Search! Also, click here if you missed the first part of the interview, and be sure to look out for Part 3 on Wednesday, May 27th.


Real Talk Publishing: Rachel Fershleiser

A lot of you are probably familiar with Tumblr --- that social media website where you can engage in your favorite fandoms, share images, stories, memes and quotes and connect with people from across the globe.

One of the cool things about Tumblr is that it has a HUGE book presence, including authors, readers, publishers, bookstores and everything in between. You can connect in Tumblr’s book club, share photos of your favorite-book-inspired manicure or participate in genuine discussions with authors about your favorite (or least favorite) character.

And even cooler still, it’s someone’s JOB to make sure that all of this “book content” runs smoothly. We talked to that person --- officially called the Head of Publisher Outreach --- for our latest Real Talk Publishing interview, and we couldn’t be more excited to share this super modern, ever-changing and fun part of the business.

Read below to get all of Rachel Fershleiser’s insights on “the bookternet,” learn what it’s like to work at a startup, discover some of Tumblr’s newest book-themed initiatives and hear why this is the best time to work in the book world --- and be sure to check out the second part of the interview on Wednesday, May 20th!


Robin Adelson - Executive Director of the CBC and Every Child a Reader, Part 3

A lot of book jobs are, understandably, inextricably connected to books themselves: writing them, editing them, designing them, publicizing them, selling them...the list goes on. But some book jobs take a step back, and instead focus on promoting literacy and reading itself.

Robin Adelson - Executive Director of the CBC and Every Child a Reader, Part 2

A lot of book jobs are, understandably, inextricably connected to books themselves: writing them, editing them, designing them, publicizing them, selling them...the list goes on. But some book jobs take a step back, and instead focus on promoting literacy and reading itself.

Robin Adelson - Executive Director of the CBC and Every Child a Reader, Part 1

A lot of book jobs are, understandably, inextricably connected to books themselves: writing them, editing them, designing them, publicizing them, selling them...the list goes on. But some book jobs take a step back, and instead focus on publishing initiatives, promoting literacy and the joy of reading itself.

Erin Hennicke, Film Scout - Part 3

Some of our favorite movies were books first, from The Hunger Games to The Godfather. But have you ever wondered how that transition happens? 

Well, it starts with people like Erin Hennicke --- a film scout at Franklin & Siegal Associates. As Erin explains, it's a film scout's job to "cover the publishing waterfront" in New York City --- reading books and magazines and talking to agents to figure out what might make a great movie, and then reporting back to film studios in Los Angeles.

Below you can find the third and final part of our interview with Erin, where she talks about the biggest change since she began as a book scout 14 years ago, the most surprising part of her job and the popular TV series she hated when she read the script.

Click here if you missed Part 1, and here if you missed part 2!  

Erin Hennicke, Film Scout - Part 2

Some of our favorite movies were books first, from The Hunger Games to The Godfather. But have you ever wondered how that transition happens? 

Well, it starts with people like Erin Hennicke --- a film scout at Franklin & Siegal Associates. As Erin explains, it's a film scout's job to "cover the publishing waterfront" in New York City --- reading books and magazines and talking to agents to figure out what might make a great movie, and then reporting back to film studios in Los Angeles.

Below you can find Part 2 of our interview with Erin, where  she talks about how she knows if something would make a good movie or TV show, who she'd cast in every movie if she had the choice and her favorite book-to-screen adaptations.

Click here if you missed Part 1, and be sure to look out for Part 3 next Wednesday, November 19th. 

Erin Hennicke, Film Scout - Part 1

Some of our favorite movies were books first, from The Hunger Games to The Godfather. But have you ever wondered how that transition happens? 

Well, it starts with people like Erin Hennicke --- a film scout at Franklin & Siegal Associates. As Erin explains, it's a film scout's job to "cover the publishing waterfront" in New York City --- reading books and magazines and talking to agents to figure out what might make a great movie, and then reporting back to film studios in Los Angeles.

Read the first section of our three-part interview with Erin, below, where she talks about how she became a scout, what she looks for when reading manuscripts and the New York Magazine article that inspired American Gangster.