Skip to main content

Fat Angie

Review

Fat Angie

FAT ANGIE starts off with Angie getting picked on by the known bully, Stacy Ann. Stacy Ann brings up Angie's sister, which is a sensitive subject to her. Angie slaps her and instantly regrets it because she doesn't like confrontation. Matter of fact, she hates it. As she was being escorted out by Coach Laden, she locked eyes with the new girl. This wasn't the normal stare she got from the other students, but a look of interest. Her name is KC Romance.

"I like the book and I feel Angie is an inspiration for teens undergoing low self-esteem and insecurity problems. Angie turned negative events into something positive for her, which everyone should do."

Jake, Angie's neighbor, seems to be taking a serious interest in her whereabouts. Not a love interest but as a protective big brother, which she already has but who cares less about her protection and actually adds on to her bullying. Wang sends a picture around of the new lesbian couple, KC and Angie, kissing. Once news of this picture spreads, Angie's mother and KC's father become disappointed in their daughter's choice of homosexuality. As a result, both Angie and KC deal with the rejection, but in different ways. Angie starts to run, and KC turns to self harm.

Angie got on the girls' basketball team wearing her sister's jersey, and shot the winning shots for her school. She had no family there to support her because her mother also disapproved of this. Angie comes home excited anyway to melancholic household, wondering what has happened. The oldest sister's death has been confirmed after months of waiting. As a result of this devastating news, Wang and Angie rekindle their brother-sister relationship and become closer, as most tragic events result in. They are still distant to their mother though.

Most sisters are really close but its different with these two. Angie's sister is the only who looks at her as Angie and not Fat Angie. Her sister left for Iraq and was captured. Everyone knew that there was a huge chance she would end up dead, but Angie wouldn't believe it...until she saw the body.

Her mom isn't any help. She acts like she doesn't care about her deceased daughter, and by the end of the book, she still doesn't change her ways. In the book, she is stated as Angie's couldn't-be-bothered mother, and her name isn't stated until almost the middle of the book.

I like the book and I feel Angie is an inspiration for teens undergoing low self-esteem and insecurity problems. Angie turned negative events into something positive for her, which everyone should do. I don't like the way the narrator kept calling her Fat Angie instead of just Angie. The point was made that she was obese, directly and indirectly. There was no reason to repeatedly state that. When I read, I become the character, and I felt somewhat offended.

Reviewed by Akia D. on April 5, 2013

Fat Angie
by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo