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Unremembered

Review

Unremembered

Jessica Brody is an established writer for women’s and teen fiction literature. If you check out her website, you will also find that she is an optimist, with degrees in Economics and French.  She has written multiple YA novels, including 52 REASONS TO HATE MY FATHER and THE KARMA CLUB, and it seems she has found her passion in this genre.UNREMEMBERED is a sci-fi thriller, with a little bit of PG romance thrown in. While this novel is entertaining, and a serious page-turner at times, it also feels too familiar or predictable.
 
"Though I felt like I had read it all before at times, I still wanted to finish it. I wanted to make sure the likeable main character was going to find out about her past and have the ability to form her own future."
 
At first, it felt fresh. It's about a girl who has woken up in the hospital with no memory at all. She does not know who she is, or where she came from...nothing. However, she does know how to speak, walk and solve impossible math problems. She is named Violet in the hospital after her unnatural eye color and taken in by an affluent family in California. The family has a teenage son who is still intimidated by pretty girls. Violet is a pretty girl and eventually coaxes him into helping her out with finding out more about who she really is. Meanwhile, there is a young man that keeps popping up and telling Violet that her real name is Sera and that he is an important part of her past. As expected, she does not trust him, but he becomes her most important asset to understanding her past.
 
Now, I was never completely disappointed or overjoyed by this novel. It was all pretty basic, kind of predictable and all-around pleasant. It is a page-turner because I just wanted to make sure I was right with my predictions, but alas, I was always right. Also, I couldn’t tell if Brody’s allusions to other popular culture books and movies was intentional or subconscious.
 
For example, Violet can understand other languages, and totally Harry Potter Parseltongue style, she does not realize she is speaking the other language until someone points it out to her. And, just so I won’t give too much away, the only scene I shall vaguely mention is the following: She is on the computer chatting with an unknown character who knows too much about who she really is. The unknown character tells her they can help her, but first someone else is going to contact her…silence…phone rings! What movie does this sound like to you? I’ll give you a hint --- sorry, she’s not The One, now eat this cookie, you’ll forget all about it.
 
UNREMEMBERED is a pleasant read, and I had a love/hate relationship with it. Though I felt like I had read it all before at times, I still wanted to finish it. I wanted to make sure the likeable main character was going to find out about her past and have the ability to form her own future. I would recommend it as a beach read.

Reviewed by Ruth Vandevanter on March 25, 2013

Unremembered
(Unremembered #1)
by Jessica Brody