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Blade Silver: Color Me Scarred

Review

Blade Silver: Color Me Scarred

Ruth
Wallace is a ticking bomb --- not one that's liable to explode, but
rather implode. Ever since her mom tried to commit suicide, Ruth's
dad and his explosive (yet previously manageable) temper have grown
to mountainous proportions. Trying as hard as she can, Ruth wracks
her brain continually in an attempt to make certain that the
household is running as smoothly as it did before her mom's
breakdown. Ruth knows that even the most minor infractions of the
house rules will send her father into a verbal rampage where he
will further humiliate, degrade, and shame her.


As Ruth knows, there is no shelter to be found running to her mom
for support. Dubbing her now depressed mother the Ghost Mom (since
she only comes out of her room when there's no one else in sight),
Ruth becomes increasingly angry and frustrated at her
circumstances. Even her younger brother, Caleb, is no help. After
one argument too many, he takes off to places unknown, leaving Ruth
solely in charge of maintaining the home --- and taking the heat
for Caleb's disappearance.


Feeling utterly alone and trapped, Ruth's only solace is to lock
herself in the bathroom, carefully remove a razor blade she's
hidden away so many times before that she's lost count, and begin
cutting. Ruth, absorbed in the ritual, feels a measure of control
every time she cuts. Following her carefully scripted routine, she
watches the blood flow, stops the bleeding with a tissue, and then
bandages the wound. For the moment, Ruth feels better --- until the
next time she needs an escape from the pain, that is.


It isn't until the weather begins to warm and Ruth continues to
wear long sleeve shirts that she realizes her cutting isn't going
to stay a secret all summer. Fretting about how to stop the cycle
causes Ruth increased stress, and only after a friend spots her
scarred arms during a clothes shopping trip does Ruth begin to face
her problem.


While there are no simple cures, she does find help from a school
counselor who gets Ruth admitted to a home for teens with
addictions. Overwhelmed and frightened (of the unknown and of her
father's reaction), Ruth wants to back out at the last second, but
doesn't. After four emotionally challenging weeks of counseling and
support, Ruth finds the strength she needs to start over; though
her journey will be tough, she's ready to let her inner and outer
scars show so that her healing will be of the lasting sort.


As with each of the previous books in the TrueColors series,
Melody Carlson addresses a frightening new trend with sensitivity
while offering practical hope to hurting teens.


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Reviewed by Michele Howe on October 18, 2011

Blade Silver: Color Me Scarred
by Melody Carlson

  • Publication Date: October 15, 2005
  • Genres: Christian, Fiction
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: NavPress
  • ISBN-10: 1576835359
  • ISBN-13: 9781576835357