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Fire and Bone

Review

Fire and Bone

In FIRE AND BONE by Rachel A. Marks, Sage discovers that her whole life has been a lie. Called a book like a clash between Percy Jackson and Gossip Girl, this novel takes us through a world of Celtic mythology and a beautifully created universe. Sage has just discovered her powers at the age of 18 as the daughter of a Celtic goddess. Now that she has finally come of age, five deities have asked for her pledge of service. Her life has begun again, full of fame, glam, magic and her own bodyguard.

The Otherworld is a new refreshing start for Sage; she could get used to it. However, when two men begin to yearn for her attention, Sage’s confidence falters. Who is there to trust in this fantastical yet strange and mysterious world? Her life is on the line as the stakes are risen. She can’t rely on only her powers to get her out of this alive.

"This introduction to Celtic mythology is one I have never seen in a young adult literature and Marks brings to life a world different from anything I’ve ever read."

The novel is written in first person perspective, and the point of view switches through two characters, from Sage to Faelan. The premise of the book is very interesting and it will make for a great series. However, with almost 450 pages, it takes around 250 just to get into the main conflict of the story. It drags in the beginning, but makes up for it with a mysterious storyline and plot. 

This introduction to Celtic mythology is one I have never seen in a young adult literature and Marks brings to life a world different from anything I’ve ever read. However, unlike Greek mythology, the gods of the Celtic world are less known and therefore the book can be confusing with deciphering who is who. It is full of funny moments and the characters, although they grow up in a different world, aren’t too different from normal humans in personality and character. The plot twists near the end also caught me by surprise.

Sage, our main character, is far from perfect but it is enjoyable to see her go through her hero’s journey and character arc. Faelan, the other main character, as Sage’s mentor, is a grumpy, dark, interesting and relatable character. There is also a love triangle between Sage, Faelan and a third character, Kieran. Kieran, although viewed as an antagonist as first, reveals that he has much more beneath; he is as Angel is to Buffy the Vampire Slayer. 

The climax and resolution left me wanting more. I’ll definitely read the sequel in the series to find out how the characters handle the plot twist and how the story will advance.

Reviewed by Jeremy H., Teen Board Member on February 26, 2018

Fire and Bone
by Rachel A. Marks