Skip to main content

Salvage

Review

Salvage

Ava is the captain's daughter on the deep space merchant space ship Parastrata. Even with her high connections, life for females isn't great on the ship. They are expected to be quiet, demure, unquestioning girls who do what they are told and don't hope for anything more. The men are the only ones who can fix things, navigate a ship and visit Earth, where some of the population of the universe lives. When Ava finds herself threatened with death, she leaves her ship and old life behind to go somewhere she never thought she would: Earth.
 
As always, there were things that I really enjoyed about this book and some I didn’t. My favorite part was the way it combined space travel and futuristic aspects with old world culture. It was the first time I’d read a book that combined these two in such a phenomenal way. Admittedly, the old world part of SALVAGE raised controversial topics --- including discrimination of women and polygamy --- but it was still interesting to read about them in a futuristic setting. 
 
The coolest thing about SALVAGE was the way two different time periods were combined --- it made it different from anything else I’ve ever read. 
 
The hardest thing about reading this novel was visualizing different events and understanding what was going on. There were many times where it seemed like it was a life-or-death situation, but I didn’t actually know what was going on, which is quite important when reading a book. I also found it hard to understand the terms Ava used to describe various things. For example, they keep track of time in terms of “turns,” which eventually got confusing for me and I just substituted years whenever I saw turns. Furthermore, reasons for certain incidents are not given, which kept me distracted from the rest of the book. Why do some people live on Earth and some live in ships? How do the ships actually work? Why are women so discriminated against, especially when this is seemingly in the future?
 
As with any book, there were positives and negatives. The coolest thing about SALVAGE was the way two different time periods were combined --- it made it different from anything else I’ve ever read. However, the difficulty I had with visualizing and understanding certain occurrences made it a bit hard to read. 

Reviewed by Pranshu A., Teen Board Member on April 8, 2014

Salvage
by Alexandra Duncan