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The Haters

Review

The Haters

In Jesse Andrew’s second literary pursuit, the theme tunes in on a slightly different artistic expression: music. While enjoying universal praise and acclaim for his first endeavor in the very memorable ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL, Andrews summed up his newest work in the most comical of ways, saying, “I feel pretty confident that this is my finest second novel yet.” I might have to agree, both because of its obviousness and because he just might be right.  
 
"Jesse Andrew’s authenticity, sense of humor and talent for creating character chemistry --- and awkward situations --- gives the whole book a unique charm."
 
Although THE HATERS may share genetic similarities with its predecessor, it can definitely hold its own. Jesse Andrew’s authenticity, sense of humor and talent for creating character chemistry --- and awkward situations --- gives the whole book a unique charm. Kind of based on a true story, like the years Jesse Andrews spent playing bass in a band, THE HATERS follows the distinct circumstances of two best friends, Wes and Corey. The duo have been chosen to participate at jazz camp, but are immediately dismayed to see a whole crowd of dudes who aren’t really that cool. Sensing their time at jazz camp is a waste, they suddenly hear the chords of a guitar played by the only girl in a ten mile radius. Instantly intrigued, the pair hold a spontaneous jam session and know that musical fate has led them to their destiny. Ash, a charismatic guitarist with a new sound, can say and do anything with little objection, which leads the trio to quit band camp and start The Haters Summer of Hate Tour with no way to trace their whereabouts, no map and a car that is barely fit to last an hour, much less a whole tour.
 
I honestly have never read a book quite like this one. I laughed in so many parts, appreciated the history of music that the book gives and loved the sincerity of each character’s personality. Although the book was a little bit juvenile, there was a lot to enjoy. The transformation and process of each individual is a key component of THE HATERS. It is evidently displayed, and, as readers, we get to see how those experiences ultimately shaped the characters at the end, making us feel like we were a bit involved. Yet, there were far too many distractions that were unnecessary. Though this seemed more of a problem towards the end, the book is filled with crass jokes and references. Take this element out, and it might easily be one of my favorite books in a long time. I would recommend this book to music lovers, those looking for a good laugh and the adventurous type.

Reviewed by Ariel G., Teen Board Member on April 28, 2016

The Haters
by Jesse Andrews