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The Infinite Pieces of Us

Review

The Infinite Pieces of Us

Math. Even the most complex problems have a solution. That’s why Esther is obsessed with math. Life. Not everything in life has a solution, and even if it does, life problems are not as easy to solve as math problems.

Esther’s family has just moved to Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. Her step-father Tom thinks that’ll be the best way to hide Esther’s past mistakes. Hopefully the giant statue of Jesus Christ will help inspire Esther to be a good Christian. Which she is not, unlike her younger sister, Hannah. Esther just wants to restart her life and keep living. She meets and befriends Jesús from the local coffee store; Color, their house cleaner who finds brightness in the world around them; Moss, Color’s intriguing older brother; and Beth, the only other girl who doesn’t fit in at church choir. Esther’s new friends embrace her, and her secret. With the help of her newfound friends, Esther learns how to accept her truth. Rebekah Crane’s THE INFINITE PIECES OF US reminds readers that we’re all a little broken, but so is everyone else.

"THE INFINITE PIECES OF US embodies teenage spirit, the book version of the concept of sneaking out with your friends in the middle of the night to stargaze, knowing you have a test the next morning."

Be warned that THE INFINITE PIECES OF US says some things that may be considered sacrilegious/offensive, especially to younger teen readers. THE INFINITE PIECES OF US also makes a lot of male genitalia jokes, and to an extent condones behaviors like premarital sex. So although this book does prominently feature Christianity, it does not always follow what most consider to be the teachings of the church and potential readers should know that before picking up the book.

My one issue with this book is that I was left with a lot of questions. I feel like there were a lot of things that were introduced to the story as ideas that were going to be, and should have been important plot points, but were never mentioned again. I was left with a lot of questions that I expected to be answered. What is Jesús’s truth? What happened to Amit? Does Tom fill the pool? I guess in life things aren’t always answered with finality right away, but I figured THE INFINITE PIECES OF US would be.

Overall, this book got me to think. Crane did an excellent job of introducing new concepts that encourage deeper thinking. She really got me to wonder about a fish’s happiness, how dry a desert really is. Crane made me wonder what love really is, what love really means. Crane asks readers to define pain and truth and lies, and how all of those relate to humanity. THE INFINITE PIECES OF US is great for making readers think a little more about things they otherwise took for granted.

THE INFINITE PIECES OF US embodies teenage spirit, the book version of the concept of sneaking out with your friends in the middle of the night to stargaze, knowing you have a test the next morning. This book deal with regret and could-have-beens, and knowing that sometimes things do turn out for the best, even if it doesn’t seem that way in the beginning. Crane reminds us that strangers can be best friends can be soul mates and that love can be found in an abandoned Blockbuster.

Reviewed by Becky N., Teen Board Member on December 18, 2018

The Infinite Pieces of Us
by Rebekah Crane